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Never Mind “can’t teach an old dog new tricks”…

New research has uncovered an unexpected twist in the tale of cyber security risks – your tech-savvy younger employees may be your biggest vulnerability.

Shocked? Let’s dive into the details.

More than 6,500 employees across the globe were surveyed, with an almost equal representation of demographics. The results were rather alarming.

The study found that younger office workers, those 40 or under, are more likely to disregard standard password safety guidelines. Can you believe that 34% admitted to using their birth dates as passwords, compared to just 19% of those over 40?

And it doesn’t stop there.

The habit of using the same password across multiple devices was also more prevalent among younger workers, with 38% admitting to doing this.

And let’s not even get started on phishing scams. A whopping 23% of the younger demographic didn’t report the last phishing attempt they received. Their reasoning? “I didn’t think it was important”.

But surely they understand the gravity of security threats against businesses, right? Well, not quite.

While ransomware and phishing were acknowledged as critical threats by 23% and 22% of employees respectively, the overall attitude towards cyber security leaves much to be desired.

Here’s the kicker: a staggering number of those surveyed revealed that their organizations did NOT provide any mandatory cyber security training.

From the US (30%) to the UK (17%), Netherlands (32%), Japan (35%), India (31%), Germany (22%), France (43%), Australia (29%) and China (65%) – the numbers speak for themselves.

So, are we really to blame our young workforce when it’s clear that businesses aren’t doing enough to equip their employees with the necessary cyber security skills?

It’s high time we stopped treating cyber security as an afterthought and started investing in regular cyber awareness training for everyone in our businesses. Yes, EVERYONE. Not just the tech team or the executives, but every single employee.

At the end of the day, it’s not just about protecting your business; it’s about creating a safer digital world for us all.

We can help you do that. Get in touch.

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That long password isn’t keeping you better protected

How secure do you think your passwords are? Do you believe that longer is always better? Well, we have some news for you. It’s time for a serious talk about password security.

New research has revealed a sobering truth – even passwords that are 15 characters long can be compromised. Yes, you read that right. It’s time to face the stark reality… length doesn’t always mean strength.

The eight-character password reigns supreme as the most compromised length of password. But don’t breathe a sigh of relief if yours is a longer one. The 15-character password also makes an appearance in the top ten most compromised lengths.

You might ask, “How could this be?” The answer lies not only in the password length but also in the content of the password and whether you use the same password on multiple sites.

The most compromised eight-character password is none other than “password” itself, while the most compromised 15-character password is “Sym_newhireOEIE”.

Doesn’t exactly feel secure, does it?

It’s not just about individual people. Businesses like yours are at high risk too. An alarming 86% of all cyber attacks start with stolen credentials. That’s nearly nine out of ten attacks. Can you afford to be complacent?

Sure, longer passwords do offer more resistance to brute force cracking. An eight-character password can be cracked in five minutes, while a good 15-character one could take up to 37 million years if it’s not following any obvious pattern (i.e., it’s random and uses many types of character). Impressive, isn’t it?

But remember, this is just one piece of the puzzle. Length alone won’t save you from stolen credentials via phishing attacks.

Use a robust business password manager. Not only will it randomly generate long passwords for you, but it will also remember them and fill in the login box for you.

You should also use two factor authentication, where you generate a code on a separate device to prove it’s you. Even if cyber criminals crack your password, they still won’t be able to access your data.

If you need help keeping your business better protected, get in touch.